Archive for April, 2012

Five Ways to Say No Without Jeopardizing Your Reputation at Work

April 27, 2012

You’re swamped. Your plate  is full. You are juggling as it is. Then your boss – or someone else at work – asks if you can take on another assignment. What do you do?

You know you should say ‘no’ to this one – but yuck…saying no is right up with your other least favorite things to do…like going to the dentist to get a cavity filled. Well, at least that’s the case for many people including a Globe and Mail reader who sent in a question to the Globe Career’s Ask an Expert Coach feature. 

New! On today’s Globe and Mail career site and in the paper edition:  Read what I wrote to this reader — “Five Ways to Say No Without Jeopardizing Your Reputation at Work”.

Sometimes saying ‘no’ is really saying yes — to being small; risking less than standard work; and more.

Reflect — what are you saying yes to when you shy away from the appropriate times to say ‘no’?

 What are your strategies, tactics, experiences with saying ‘no’ when it is appropriate?

Additional ResourcesSee my Webinar/Workshop page on this blog for a listing of Webinars (free) — including: Are you Addicted to the Yes Habit? As well, a couple more articles related to how to learn to say no from Investment Executive. See Part I and Part II (Investment Executive, March 2012).

Here’s to a TGIM Work + Life.

Eileen

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Do You Need a Title or Authority to be a Leader?

April 24, 2012

A big part of my coaching practice is related to leadership development. I coach leaders – of all levels – to bring the best of themselves to work (and life). My focus is to help individuals (and groups) optimize their personal, professional wellbeing and to recognize the impact they can have on others — and learn a whole bunch of personal/professional skills along the way.

But do you have to be an ‘official’ leader to lead? Do you need the authority to influence? The title – and formal position?

I don’t think you do. Authentic leadership is a skill and not a position. And it is essential for anyone who wants to bring their best to their work and life. 

This is the theme of a workshop I am facilitating tomorrow at the Administrative Professionals Conference in Toronto- called “10 Ways to Lead.”

Here’s a shout-out of thanks to Dr. Gail Levitt of Levitt Communications Inc. who invited me to this particular conference opportunity. Gail is a professional colleague whom I respect greatly – we share this similar philosphy about leadership.

I’ve always believed that leadership is not limited to one’s title. In fact, when I started Big Cheese Coaching in 2003, I chose the name “Big Cheese” to reflect my belief that we can all be ‘Big Cheeses” regardless of our positions if we access and develop our potential and hone our authentic leadership.

Sure there are oodles of skills to learn to be a great leader — and I love diving into those ‘buckets’ — but my message is: we all have a leader within. Own and hone your leadership and you will have a greater chance of leading/living your life by design and not default. Now who wouldn’t want that!?

Here’s to the leader within each of us!

TGIM Work+Life

Eileen

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How To Develop That Dream Job Without Losing Focus on Your Day Job

April 18, 2012

Oh this one speaks to my heart – and my work-life. A Globe and Mail reader writes to Globe and Mail Careers – Ask an Expert feature  – asking how she can juggle the demands of two careers. She has a day job but also a ‘passion’ career that she would like grow. Doing both – she confesses, is ‘hard’. How to juggle both?

Read the article here – and the advice I offered to this reader.

TGIM work-life is all about passion. Waking up with optimism for the day. Going to work with a sense of ‘mojo’ because you want to, not just because you have to. But sometimes our work doesn’t quite allow for that – or it does to some extent but you want ‘more’. More fulfillment, personal expression, authenticity — or whatever your ‘more’ is. Enter the second career – and for some, managing two at once. 

Some people take on a second careers to pursue an interest, or a passion or simply transition to a new frontier. Not everyone can afford to do a hard stop on career #1 to pursue #2. For many, that ‘transition’ means having to manage two careers at once.

Not easy – but it can be rewarding. Especially if you like both. Hmmm…too much of a good thing sometime? Oh, bring on that balancing act! Learn to juggle! Learn to prioritize….and more!

Are you managing two careers? What have you learned? What ‘tricks and tips’ would be helpful to others. Please share!

To your TGIM Work-Life in all your careers!

Eileen

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